Microsoft Buildings 30, 31 and 32

Microsoft Buildings 30, 31 and 32

This impressive project received the 2017 Redevelopment/Renovation of the Year Award from the NAIOP Washington State Chapter and the 2017 Engineering News-Record Northwest Regional Best Projects Award of Merit for Interior Design/Tenant Improvement.

This impressive project received the 2017 Redevelopment/Renovation of the Year Award from the NAIOP Washington State Chapter and the 2017 Engineering News-Record Northwest Regional Best Projects Award of Merit for Interior Design/Tenant Improvement.

Location
Redmond, WA
Client
Microsoft
Year Completed
2017
Sector
Buildings
Market Type
Interiors & Special Projects

This project involved the multi-phased, multi-contracted build-out of Buildings 30, 31 and 32. These buildings occupied 338,423 square feet and were transformed over the course of a 7-month schedule. Project goals included rebuilding the space to accommodate new workplace environment that supports and promotes Microsoft’s Intelligent Workplace. The scope includes complete interior demolition and renovation, and the build-out of open office work neighborhoods, expansive lobbies and atriums, open meeting areas, conference rooms, team rooms, focus rooms, phone rooms, relaxation rooms, game and Xbox rooms, meditation rooms, mother rooms, mini-markets and a central HUB. This project also included six unique Life Cycle Renewals including new roofing on four buildings, new chilled water system, 12 new air handlers and added fire pumps, as well as District Improvements that include landscaping, covered walkways, covered amphitheater, outdoor dining facilities, new decks, and outdoor meetings spaces.

Overcoming Challenges

The design required our Seattle team to remove a 300-square-foot section of the existing PT slab on six of the nine floors to create a huge 3-story atrium in each building. The structural engineer’s preliminary review suggested shoring of the PT slab across the entire span of the building for each of these relatively small sections of slab to be removed. The extent of shoring precipitated a significant impact on the sequence of construction operations, particularly demolition and MEP roughin. Our project team devised an approach which allowed them to sequence the release of existing PT strands rather than a full release of the affected area, reducing the overall area needed for shoring by almost 70%. This one constructability observation yielded a $150,000 savings to the budget in shoring and released three weeks of construction back to the project by allowing overhead MEP rough-in and demolition to begin in tandem.

“There would not have been such a successful project if the entire team had not exhibited exceptional collaborative behavior...you always solved the challenges with appropriate decisions which balanced the competing elements of cost, schedule, and aesthetics, yet exhibiting thoughtful consideration for the future employee experience.”
– Gid Palmer, Senior Development Manager, Microsoft