IH 10 Harris County Elysian Viaduct Bridge

IH 10 Harris County Elysian Viaduct Bridge

Balfour Beatty’s Elysian Viaduct bridge reconstruction project improves safety, accommodates a growing population, enhances mobility, and improves local transportation connections in one of Houston’s historic neighborhoods.

Balfour Beatty’s Elysian Viaduct bridge reconstruction project improves safety, accommodates a growing population, enhances mobility, and improves local transportation connections in one of Houston’s historic neighborhoods.

Location
Houston, TX
Client
Texas Department of Transportation
Sector
Highways & Bridges
Value
$50M - $100M
Market Type
Highways & Bridges

Extending nearly a mile-and-a-half from Brooks Street to Commerce Street in Houston, the Elysian Viaduct bridge reconstruction project crosses over the heavily traveled I-10 highway. The project improves safety, accommodates a growing population, enhances mobility and improves connectivity in the local area. Balfour Beatty’s scope of work included:

  • Replacing and widening the bridge structure to accommodate paved shoulders

  • Increasing the structural integrity of the bridge to current design standards

  • Improving the roadway approaches to the bridge

  • Adding shoulders to the four-lane roadway within a varying ROW width (90 feet to 120 feet)

  • Adding a five-foot-wide sidewalk along the east side of the northbound lanes between Runnels and Ruiz streets

In 2020, when many commuters stayed home due to Covid-19 resulting in fewer cars on the road, Balfour Beatty and TxDOT maximized opportunities to fast-track work on the Elysian Viaduct project. To mitigate impacts of major activities such as placing bridge beams and completing deck pours, the team strategically shut down I-10 eastbound and westbound on one early morning, enabling an expedited completion. 

The old Elysian Viaduct was built in the 1950s in a historic area of Houston. The area, known as Frost Town, is one of Houston’s first neighborhoods, dating back to the 1830s. TxDOT archeologists, guided by the National Historic Preservation Act, continue to learn about the area’s history through this and other TxDOT projects.